Events

SouthwestNET: Postcommodity Exhibit, feat. Cristobal Martinez

Date & Time: 
Saturday-Sunday, Jan. 31-Apr. 26
Location: 
Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (7374 E 2nd St) Scottsdale, AZ
Campus: 
Off campus

ASU English PhD student and artist Cristobal Martinez participates with the indigenous artist collective "Postcommodity" in this installation for SMoCA.

More information: http://www.smoca.org/exhibition/southwestnet-crosspollination

Please note--this announcement is provided as a courtesy; the exhibition is not sponsored by ASU English.

Thew and Laird Elementary Schools Book Drive

Date & Time: 
Monday-Friday, Mar. 2-27
Location: 
Donate books to Language and Literature 2nd flr Workroom (LL 215) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

Shouldn’t every child have a book in his or her home? Reading allows children to be connected to their community, to the world and even themselves. Unfortunately, there are children who have no books in their home, but you can help alleviate this problem. Won’t you help the Arizona State English Department Community Engagement Committee get books into the hands of children who deserve them? 

Thew Elementary school is located in Tempe, Arizona and they serve Kindergarten through 6th grade students who range in age from 4-14. There are a total of 555 students enrolled and 89% of them are on free or reduced lunch.

Laird elementary school is located in Tempe as well and they serve Kindergarten through 8th grade students who range from 5 to 13. There are a total of 520 students; 86% of these are on a free and reduced lunch.

The principals at these schools have expressed a desire to get books into the students’ hands, and it is their hope to be able to host a free book fair where students will get to come into the room and select books to keep at no cost to the students. The joy of being able to pick out a book for your very own, that you get to keep is something every child should experience.

This is where you can help! If you can make a donation by giving new or gently used books, or make a financial donation, you will help give a child the gift of reading. We are planning to present the schools with the books at the end of March, so we are asking for donations by March 27th. We can also use credit at places like Bookman’s, Zia’s or Changing Hands if you prefer. If you would like to claim this on your taxes, you can find the appropriate form (322) here: http://www.azdor.gov/Forms/Credits.aspx  and the tax id # for the district is 86-6000-480.

If you would prefer to donate new or gently used books directly, we are in need of the following numbers of books for each grade level:

Kindergarten
130

1st grade

100

2nd grade

120

3rd grade

135

4th grade

110

5th grade

110

6th grade

100

7th grade

42

8th grade

42
 

Please make any checks out to Lee Bebout and deliver them to his 5th floor mailbox, or you can bring donated books to LL 215

Thank you so much for your generosity.
 
If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Alice Hays at adhays@asu.edu.

Coleridge and Contemplation Conference, feat. Mark Lussier

Date & Time: 
Friday-Sunday, Mar. 27-29
Location: 
Kyoto Notre Dame University (1 Shimogamo Minaminonogamicho, Sakyo Ward) Kyoto, Japan
Campus: 
Off campus

ASU English Professor and Chair Mark Lussier is a keynote presenter at this international conference. The conference aims to recover a contemplative direction in Philosophy and in Literary Studies and returns to the poetic works and philosophical writings of S. T. Coleridge in the service of reflections on contemplation.

More information: http://kyotocontemplation.org

Please note--this announcement is provided as a courtesy; the conference is not sponsored by ASU English.

4th Annual Prison Education Conference

Date & Time: 
Friday, Mar. 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Location: 
Memorial Union Turquoise Room (MU 220) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

The Prison Education Awareness Club (PEAC) presents the 4th Annual Prison Education Conference, featuring Kyes Stevens from the Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project and Judith Tannenbaum, teaching artist and author of Disguised as a Poem: My Years Teaching Poetry at San Quentin and By Heart: Poetry, Prison, and Two Lives. Alongside them, representatives from the Arizona Department of Corrections, Rio Salado Distance Learning Program, and ASU prison teaching will speak.
 
The conference is free of charge and open to the public, but seating is limited so advance RSVP is required. A complimentary lunch will be provided.
 
In addition to PEAC, conference sponsors include the Department of English and the School of Social Transformation, both academic units in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which is also a sponsor.

More information: peac.org@asu.edu

Printable flyer: https://asuevents.asu.edu/sites/default/files/2015PrisonConference.pdf

A Lab for Ideas: A Presentation and Conversation with Uri Aviv, Film Fest Director

Date & Time: 
Tuesday, Mar. 31, 4-5 p.m.
Location: 
Language and Literature 316 (LL 316) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

Hosted by the ASU Center for Science and the Imagination (directed by ASU English Assistant Prof Ed Finn), this informal presentation and conversation will celebrate science fiction as a laboratory for big visionary ideas, and the intricate and mutually inspirational relationship between science and science fiction.

Science fiction filmmakers, authors and designers explore the ludicrous, the fantastic and the impossible. They give names to new and as-yet-nameless ideas and things –such as the robot, clone, submarine and atomic bomb, and concepts such as big brother, cyberspace, virtual reality and the technological singularity.

While science fiction can be highly inventive, innovative and sometime predictive in how it deals with technology, at the core of science fiction are stories about people – communities, governments, corporations, families, individuals and their complex relationships, science fiction explores how we mutate and evolve with scientific progress, and how we use and abuse technology.

In a world immersed in science and completely reliant on technology, there is paramount importance for texts to alert us, inspire us, and discuss science, technology, society and our vision of the future.

Uri Aviv is a cultural entrepreneur based in Israel and the General Director of Utopia: The Tel-Aviv International Festival for Science, Imagination and Future Visions. The event features an international film festival, literary, academic, and science-oriented programs, public lectures and panels, art workshops, and more. Uri previously had a career in high-tech, working as a consultant for project coordination, requirements analysis and as an expert on identity management and workflow systems. Learn more at https://about.me/uriaviv

This event is free; email Joey Eschrich at jpe@asu.edu with any questions.

FMS Speaker Series with Kitior Ngu: “Crafting the Perfect Playbook: NFL TV and the Value of Mediated Sociality"

Date & Time: 
Wednesday, Apr. 1, 3-4:15 p.m.
Location: 
Language and Literature 103 (LL 103) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

The Film and Media Studies Program in the Department of English hosts a presentation by Kitior Ngu, doctoral candidate and Rackham Merit Fellow at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Ngu's talk centers on mediated virtual lounge spaces for NFL fans. It explores the interdependency between fans and the industry, uncovering the dynamics at play in these sites as crucial elements needed to foster a critical understanding of contemporary television as a socially interactive medium.

Kitior Ngu's research centers on connected viewing practices that have emerged around television in the contemporary media landscape. She is currently working on her dissertation titled, "Unsettling TV: Social Connectivity and Television in the Digital Age," where she interrogates the political and socio-cultural economy of prime-time television's ecosystem, querying the ways in which social practices, platforms and contexts acquire differential meanings in the contemporary period. She previously served as a Compass Fellow with the New America Foundation, where she co-published the article, "Virtually Unused: Virtual Private Networks and Public Internet Users."

Part of English's Film and Media Studies Guest Speaker Series.

More information: Kevin.Sandler@asu.edu

Printable flyer: https://asuevents.asu.edu/sites/default/files/fmsngu15.pdf

Climate Fiction - Science, Stories or Seeds of Transformation? feat. Joni Adamson

Date & Time: 
Thursday, Apr. 2, 12-1:45 p.m.
Location: 
The Biodesign Institute, Bldg B, Auditorium B105 (BDB B105) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

ASU English Professor Joni Adamson is featured in this panel discussion on the literary genre of "Cli-Fi." Internationally renowned award winning authors like Margaret Atwood, Paolo Bacigalupi and Ian McEwan are turning to the emerging genre of Climate Fiction - or Cli-Fi - to tell stories set in a climatically changed world.

The Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative invites you to a panel discussion on Cli-Fi that will discuss the nature and roots of the genre and its impact or influence beyond simply telling stories. Can a story trigger a social movement? Does it offer science lessons? Could a book change politics or societies? How? 

Adding some interactivity to the discussion, the panel will engage attendees to create on-the-spot Cli-Fi storytelling with a short flash fiction exercise. A light lunch will be served.

The Panel:

Joni Adamson
Professor of English and Environmental Humanities, ASU Department of English
Senior Sustainability Scholar, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

Clark Miller
Associate Director, Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes
Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

Sydney Lines
ASU LightWorks Communications Program Coordinator

Manjana Milkoreit
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives

More information and RSVP: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/climate-fiction-science-stories-or-seeds-of-...

Clare Prendergast MA Applied Project Presentation

Date & Time: 
Thursday, Apr. 2, 2:30 p.m.
Location: 
Language and Literature 316 (LL 316) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

Committee: Elly van Gelderen (chair), Bryan Smith (member) ;; ABSTRACT; Brief Description: This applied project explores the intersection of forensic linguistics with medical writing—specifically, how much “voice” does an author transfer to academic publications in the medical field? The standard register of medical journals is one which is meant to be devoid of individuality or bias; rather, these journals are generally designed to be vehicles for the transport of scientific breakthroughs or innovative medical and surgical techniques. In this project, I used various tests to compare five blinded articles from a leading neurosurgical journal, with the ultimate goal of determining which two have the first author in common.

More Information: sheila@asu.edu

At Home: Veterans Read and Share Stories (Arizona Humanities), with Dan Shilling

Date & Time: 
Thursday, Apr. 2, 6:30-8 p.m.
Location: 
Burton Barr Central Library, Meeting Rm C (1221 N Central Ave) Phoenix, AZ
Campus: 
Off campus

ASU English alumnus Dan Shilling (PhD 1987) co-facilitates (with Brian Gray of the Assisting Veterans Wellness Foundation) this free, five-session book group with dinner included. Both female and male veterans are welcome to join. The group will read short stories and essays from classic and contemporary authors and talk about their own stories with fellow veterans. Presented by Arizona Humanities.

To register: Nancy Dallett, 480-965-9331   |   nancy.dallett@asu.edu

More information: http://www.azhumanities.org/event/at-home-veterans-read-and-share-storie...

 

"What Can 19th Century Literature Tell Us About Energy?" Talk by Kent Linthicum

Date & Time: 
Friday, Apr. 3, 12-1:15 p.m.
Location: 
Wrigley Hall Rm 481 (WGHL 481) ASU
Campus: 
Tempe campus

ASU English PhD candidate Kent Linthicum gives this presentation as part of the ASU LightWorks Lecture Series.

Energy is the foremost question of the 21st century: is there enough of it? How should we use it? These questions are not unique to us. This talk will focus on how the modern conception of energy started in the 19th century and explore how writers in industrial Britain began to wrestle with questions of energy use, its consequences, and the advancement of sciences like thermodynamics. Texts like Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Dracula by Bram Stoker, and The Time Machine by H.G. Wells help show how conversations about energy exploitation and use were expressed in literature, and to demonstrate how humanities research can help us with modern questions.

Kent Linthicum received his bachelor's from the University of the Pacific in California. His research focuses on the history and intersections of literature and science in the 19th century, specifically how they conceived of the environment with the goal of comprehending how humanity interacts with its environment. His dissertation focuses on literary representations of volcanoes in the 19th century, to find out how people in the 19th century understood massive environmental phenomena that operated on geologic time.

More information: https://sustainability.asu.edu/events/rsvp/kent-linthicum

Please note--this announcement is provided as a courtesy; the event is not sponsorec by ASU English.